End of the Year “Reading Round Up”

About a year ago, I was doing videos reviewing books that I was reading for a while, and then I stopped.  I’m still reading, and I’ll definitely give you some recommendations, but I didn’t want to do anymore video reviews.  I keep track of what I read when, and things on Goodreads, which I think is a pretty good site to see what you’re friends are into reading, as well as get recommendations or updates when an author you like has published a new book.

Here are all the books I read in 2017:

A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking:

Alright, this is a non-fiction book about science, and it covers a ton, and that alone can be kind of daunting.  What I think can be said about this book, is that arguably the smartest living person, Stephen Hawking, manages to make some of the things he knows accessible to people of average intelligence like myself.  Did I get all of it? No.  Did I learn a lot?  Yes.  And I found it pretty interesting.

The Old Man and The Sea by Ernest Hemingway:

I had to read The Sun Also Rises in high school, and I remember being bored enough, that I didn’t finish it.  Then fast forward 10 or more years, and I had to read several short stories by Hemingway, which I found to all be very interesting.  So I figured out which book was his shortest, hoping perhaps that he was better in a shorter form.  I was rewarded by finding that this book which is considered a novella and not a full novel, is amazing.  I’ve heard people talk about it as boring, but honestly I think it was paced beautifully and kept me riveted until the very end.

Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck:

Unfortunately, I waited to long before I read this.  It was a good book, don’t get me wrong, but I had seen so many Of Mice and Men references, and parodies, that I understood largely what was going to happen, and there wasn’t much that was new to me.  Hint: read this book before watching Tropic Thunder (Simple Jack is a parody of this) and there is a Key and Peele sketch about rap battles which gives away the ending.

Side note: I don’t blame any film referencing this book, it’s almost 90 years old, and I hadn’t read it.  It was my fault.

Eloah’s Amulet: Beurie by L.M. Chilcott:

Full disclosure on this, I know the author.  I did a full review on the book’s Amazon page.  It’s Christian fantasy, and I would say that I didn’t relate to a lot of it, but I think that is largely because I wasn’t the target demographic.  I think this book is YA and probably aimed more at females.  Also, I really haven’t read a whole lot of pure fantasy, what I’ve read is considered “Urban Fantasy” which means Earth and real society is interwoven into the fantasy elements.  I could not finish The Hobbit, or Lord of The Rings, or The Chronicles of Narnia, but I was able to find this enjoyable.  So take my word with a grain of salt.

The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay by Michael Chabon:

Do you like superheroes? What about WWII history?  This book tells the story of two cousins during the rise of the super hero in comic books, and how it corresponds with WWII.  I don’t think you need to be a fan of either to enjoy it, but if you are, it’s a must read.  This was by far my favorite book I read this past year, and I would put it in my top 5 of all time.

Side note: I looked it up on Goodreads, and one of the reviews gave it one star and it might be the greatest dumb review of all time.  Basically the review is written as a conversation between the author and Ayelet Waldman in which they talk about how original it is to write about the Holocaust and Jewish boys in Brooklyn, and the invention of comic books.  Honestly, it’s the most bizarre review, and it may be some kind of sarcastic art piece of it’s own for all I know.

The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood:

I just finished this book yesterday, so this is fresh in my mind. The world she has created is very clear to her, and it is amazing when you realize it was published in 1985 how prescient it is, (she talks about a major terrorist attack by Muslim extremists being used as an excuse for the government to take away liberties, as well as people suspecting it was the government and not Muslim extremists in the first place.)

Now, I haven’t seen the Hulu show yet, but I think in many ways, it feels like a blueprint for a TV show, or a film, and not so much its own standalone entity.  What I mean in that is, that there seems to be more emphasis on world building than on story telling.  Which is fine, I feel that way often when I read classic dystopian literature.

 

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